handfont_header

Frequently Asked Questions

Why is it necessary to have myself or my child evaluated first? Can't we just skip the evaluation and treat what's going on?

Without a comprehensive evaluation, it will be difficult to determine the baseline of functioning that will allow for individualized, targeted treatment and may limit the effectiveness of therapy being provided.

What does the evaluation process entail?

Intake paperwork consisting of several questionnaires is sent out prior to the initial appointment via email. These assessments should be completed by the parent (and child or adolescent when indicated) and brought to the initial session. A "get to know you" interview will occur in the first half hour to help create an occupational profile and determine preliminary goals, which will be followed by standardized testing and clinical observation. Initial findings will be shared with the parent and the child/adolescent (as appropriate) at the end of the session, and a follow-up appointment will be scheduled before concluding the process.

How often do I or my child typically need to come for treatment? For how long?

Since every individual's situation is unique, it is not possible to determine how much coaching or therapy will be required for remediation. Some parents choose to have their child come once a week, other families opt for bi-monthly or every 3 weeks and engage in a personalized comprehensive home treatment program in the interim weeks. Goals and outcomes will be determined with your input after the initial evaluation, and ongoing monitoring will occur to track progress over time.

What types of payment do you accept?

Cash, check, and Venmo are all accepted forms of payment. Credit cards are accepted via Square; a 2% merchant fee will be added to your bill.

Do you accept insurance? What can you provide to help with "out of pocket" reimbursement?

Unfortunately, Kim does not accept insurance. A receipt will be provided at the end of the evaluation and each session that is pre-formatted to provide the necessary information your insurance company requires for "out of pocket" practitioners. A referring doctor or your child's pediatrician can also provide you with a prescription for "occupational therapy evaluation and treatment" that lists an accepted "ICD-10" diagnostic code that you can also submit to insurance; doing it this way can help to identify the services as "medically necessary." It is recommended to contact your provider directly to determine reimbursement amounts and limitations.

Money is tight. What can I do to get the services my child needs?

Payment plans can be negotiated at a pre-arranged rate and schedule prior to the initial evaluation. The written evaluation report will be released once payment is received in full.